TRYING TO GET PUBLISHED

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

image

credit: coffeefueledscience

chemgags:

our chemistry teachers are so punny

chemgags:

our chemistry teachers are so punny

(via scientistsarepeopletoo)

I feel like most of my life choices can be summed up with this gif:

zimriya:

image

(via selfconfessedinsanity)

loser-fish:

Today in biology the teacher asked “why do chromosomes have to stick together?” And I whispered “because they’re bromosomes” and the guy next to me just about died laughing

(via shychemist)

lordtableshark:

mermaidskey:

This gets on my nerves so much you have no idea.

THIS

lordtableshark:

mermaidskey:

This gets on my nerves so much you have no idea.

THIS

(via scientistsarepeopletoo)

nbchannibal:

*whispers* graduated cylinder

Literally we have to yell in our lab because the hoods are the loudest in the building.

(via shychemist)

geekychair:

hit-it-and-quidditch:

allthingshyper:

ionosphere-negate:

le-claire-de-lune:

crowdog66:

smellslikegirlriot:

If you are reading this, thank this woman. Her name is Grace Hopper, and she is one of the most under appreciated computer scientists ever. You think Gates and Jobs were cool? THIS WOMAN WORKED ON COMPUTERS WHEN THEY TOOK UP ROOMS. She invented the first compiler, which is a program that translates a computer language like Java or C++ into machine code, called assembly, that can be read by a processor. Every single program you use, every OS and server, was made possible by her first compiler.

Spread the word! (Although I’ll bet there are still some dudebros out there who’ll claim she’s a “fake geek”…)

Favorite fact: She coined the term “debugging” when they had to remove an moth (an actual, living moth) that had gotten trapped in the Mark II computer at Harvard University in 1947. While referring to glitches as bugs existed before, she brought the term into popularity. 

She also got the trend of personal computers going with her suggestion to the DoD to use more smaller units rather than one big one.

Please explain to me why I never knew about her before?

you know why

She was also a very proud member of the United States Navy and  attained the rank of Rear Admiral lower-class. When she gave lectures she would always be uniform. She was 79 when she officially retired from the Navy, the oldest naval officer at the time.

geekychair:

hit-it-and-quidditch:

allthingshyper:

ionosphere-negate:

le-claire-de-lune:

crowdog66:

smellslikegirlriot:

If you are reading this, thank this woman. Her name is Grace Hopper, and she is one of the most under appreciated computer scientists ever. You think Gates and Jobs were cool? THIS WOMAN WORKED ON COMPUTERS WHEN THEY TOOK UP ROOMS. She invented the first compiler, which is a program that translates a computer language like Java or C++ into machine code, called assembly, that can be read by a processor. Every single program you use, every OS and server, was made possible by her first compiler.

Spread the word! (Although I’ll bet there are still some dudebros out there who’ll claim she’s a “fake geek”…)

Favorite fact: She coined the term “debugging” when they had to remove an moth (an actual, living moth) that had gotten trapped in the Mark II computer at Harvard University in 1947. While referring to glitches as bugs existed before, she brought the term into popularity. 

She also got the trend of personal computers going with her suggestion to the DoD to use more smaller units rather than one big one.

Please explain to me why I never knew about her before?

you know why

She was also a very proud member of the United States Navy and  attained the rank of Rear Admiral lower-class. When she gave lectures she would always be uniform. She was 79 when she officially retired from the Navy, the oldest naval officer at the time.

(via shychemist)

Every time I have to light a bunsen burner

adventuresinchemistry:

image

(via shychemist)

thenomadundergrad:

I’m always mesmerised by the rotavap

thenomadundergrad:

I’m always mesmerised by the rotavap

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